Scenario: Building Questions

As an action learning coach, how would you handle the following situation: The participants have asked some really powerful questions and are clearly building on each other’s questions.

Tags: Action Leaning, Action Learning Coach, WIAL, WIAL Action Learning, WIAL Talk

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Comments (15)

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    MARCIA REGINA 06522600803

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    I would let the group follow its momentum and would only intervene if there was any situation of group learning.

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    Michael Lu

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    I will acknowledge them and process them with the team at the end of the session to check their experience and how it has serve them. I would also want to help them see how they can apply them back in the workplace.

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    Yixuan Liu

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    I would let the paticipants review the behavior they had done, ask them the influence of the behavior and how they would do after.

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    Mecaela Paula Peralta

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    I will keep track of these powerful questions so I can echo these during the reflections at the end of the session. I will also put a reminder for myself to ask, when an opportunity arises, “What allowed the team to ask powerful questions?”

    Unless there is a need to intervene, I will let them continue working well as a team.

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    Romila Chopra

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    I will let the team continue with their questioning and reflections and make notes of the key questions and the impact on the group. At an appropriate time , I would like to intervene and ask the group to become aware of the process by asking them ” This looks like a good time for learning . How are we doing on building on each others questions ? Why is it important that build on each other’s questions? What is the impact on the group of building on each others questions ?
    The objective is to call out the good , provide time for reflection and reinforce the good behavior and process .

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    xiaotsing ma

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    One of the purpose of action learning coaches is to help teams improve communication efficiency, so it is important to help them to see how they behave, whether ineffective or well done. Coaches can use feedback to help team members learn effective parts. I will record the wonderful questions at this stage, intervene in the gap of the dialogue, give my feedback on how I feel about this dialogue, and invite team to review like bellow:
    “How did you feel just now?”
    “What are the effective ways in which we listen to each other?”
    “How do we use those spirits to help ourself to discover the solution in the future?”

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    Zishan Siddiqui

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    For an Action Learning Coach, there cannot be a better moment. This is what is required from an Action Learning Session. However I will still look for the opportunities to ensure the adherence to the script and ground rules.

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    SHAINA VANEK

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    As an action learning coach, I would be thrilled! I would not intervene and let them continue to build upon each other’s questions and enjoy their action learning experience! I would, however, utilize the end of the session debrief to ask the team to identify a time when they were building on each other’s questions and create an opportunity for them to learn/actively think about the power of teamwork and building on each other’s questions. That way, the opportunity for reflection was not lost, but I wouldn’t have gotten involved mid-session and potentially gotten them off track.

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    David RECORD

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    As the Coach, in the situation like this, at the next intervention I would ask the Group a question, “On a scale of 1 to 10, how do you think you are getting on with building on other peoples’ questions and asking powerful questions, where a score of 1 is not very well and 10 is very well?”

    Following on from this, I would then ask them if they could give any examples of where the other group members had asked especially powerful questions or where other group members have asked double loop questions that were building on other questions.

    This would encourage them to learn for themselves and identify the positive aspects to their Action Learning session.

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    Catie Harrison

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    In the moment, I would let them keep building on each other. I do not want to interrupt this productive energy flow. I would make note a few of the questions being asked and during the set intervention reflection time when talking about how they are doing – I would acknowledge this behavior, share some examples and ask the group “How did this series of questions impact the team?” – so they have time to specifically reflect on the value of the process.

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    Monica Teófilo

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    I probably leave the group continue the session and my attention probably would be to the practices of the leadership competences that each participant is development on the session.

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    June Carter

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    I would start jotting down some of the powerful questions the team is asking, noting individuals who were asking the questions as well, but not interrupt the process. During the next timed intervention, when I ask the group to reflect on how they are doing, I would acknowledge this behavior of asking powerful questions, share a few examples and ask the group “How did this series of questions impact the group?” At the end of the session, I would look to see if any of the participants had selected Ask Powerful Questions as a leadership skill they were focused on, and if so, I would again point out the examples I noticed they specifically asked. I would also help them think about how they might use this back on the job or in their lives to expand application beyond the Action Learning sessions.

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    Yesong Yang

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    Powerful, problem-based questions can help teams generate more creative and breakthrough ideas and problem-solving ideas, and stimulate leadership development.

    At this point, the coach can record strong problems, but avoid intervention, so that the whole team system can continue to work, self-reflection and positive thinking about solutions. The coach continued to observe the development of the team. In the next intervention or final review of team performance, he gave feedback on the situation and invited the team to review. The coach can ask: How did you feel just now? What is the value and impact of these problems? Why are these powerful questions raised? What is the value of this spirit to the organization?

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    Chaofan (Suprince) MA

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    I would not intervene the group at this point and would let them continue their momentum. I would write down those powerful questions and reserve to share with the team till the end. During the debrief session in the end, I’d ask the team “What were some examples of effective questions during the discussion that have helped the team to find their solution together?” If the team members come up those great questions , I will recognize them too. If the team members do not raise them during the reflection, I would share with them as my observation and recognition.

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    Yesong Yang

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    At this point, the action learning coach can document strong problems but avoid intervention so that the whole team system can continue to work, self-reflect and think positively about solutions. The coach continues to observe the development of the team, feedback on the situation and invite the team to review it at the next intervention or final review of the team’s performance.
    Action learning coach stepped in to ask: “what do you think of the quality of the questions and inquiries? What is the value and impact of quality questioning and effective follow-up? Why are these powerful questions being asked? What is the value of this spirit to the organization?”

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