Scenario: Curious Questions

As an action learning coach, how would you handle the following situation: The participants are asking extraordinarily curious questions.

Tags: Action Learning, Action Learning Coach, WIAL, WIAL Action Learning, WIAL Talk

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Comments (18)

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    Michael Lu

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    First it definitely depends on what you meant by extraordinarily curious questions, what does extraordinary look/sounds like. But I would definitely like to see that question to be serves as a great opportunity to get the conversations and further questions going around the table. I might even encourage the questions by acknowledging it.

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    MARCIA REGINA 06522600803

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    I would let the group go on with the questions, but if I realize that they are questions that do not go explore the problem I would ask the group a question about how we are exploring the problem, a score from 1 – 10.

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    Aleksandra Lemanska

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    I would stop the group and say that I’ve noticed that they are asking curious questions – am I seeing right? If so, I would ask how are they feeling with those questions? Was there a situation that somebody felt uncomfortable with it? If so – what can we do to avoid this feeling?
    But at the other side – to not to kill the creativity in the group, I would ask why is it important to ask curious questions? How can those questions support us in finding a solution to the problem presenter?

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    Wanchana Kaewwirun

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    I would ask the group members that “How are the questions using in this session ?” Then wait for the reply. If most of them ok with these questions. I will reflect the facts that most of people are ok with that But some of us are not comfortable. Team ! What should we decide to move on ? (Ask agreement from team). Then go with the team decision (but have to be in the way of creating learning among group members).

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    Zishan Siddiqui

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    Although the context needs to be explained as what is the meaning of extra ordinarily curious question. As an Action Learning Coach, I will encourage such questions as such question leads to the exploration of fresh perspectives which are very essential for Action Learning. However if I feel that the conversation is not going in the right direction, I will remind the group by asking “How are the questions using in this session ?”.

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    Amanda Leung

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    I would keep observing the discussion and see if such questions are benefits to the team discussion. If not, I may intervene by asking them “How are the questions using in this session?”. Let the team explore the directions and impacts of the questions, and let them decide whether such questions are leading to the solution. If they think the situation needs improvements, then I would ask them how to improve and how such improvements can support to get the solution of the problem presenter.

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    Marcelo Conte

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    Simple, if the extraordinary questions were in accordance with the subject (related problem), it would let flow normally, otherwise, through some “insertions and / or questions and / or recall of time” could try to show to the group that these questions without focus would “eat” the time the group would have to get to the root problem or to determine a consensus on possible remedial actions.

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      Marcelo Conte

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      Simple, if the extraordinary issues were in agreement with the subject (related problem), it would let flow normally, otherwise, through some “insertions and / or questions and / or reminders of time” could try to show the group that these issues without focus Would “eat” the group’s time to reach the basic problem or to determine a consensus on possible corrective actions. Would you also ask the group how the balance of participation is? What would be the impact of continuing these extraordinary issues? And how would you like to deal with this situation?

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    Michal Weyna

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    Extraordinarily curious questions could be helpful or not. I’d ask the group during a standard intervention about “how are the questions helping you understand the root cause of the problem?”. This will allow the team to make a judgment if the curiosity is “on the topic” or if it deviates too much from the purpose of the session. It’s also an opportunity for the presenter to share if he/she feels the curiosity is helpful.

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    David RECORD

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    To answer this I would want to clarify by what you mean by curious; I could interpret curious two ways, a) as either being too personal (which is negative) or b) powerfully revealing (which is positive).

    In the first scenario, at the next intervention I would ask the Group a question, “On a scale of 1 to 10, how comfortable do you feel with some of the questions being asked, where a score of 1 is not very well and 10 is very well?”

    Following on from this, I would then ask them if they could give any examples of where they had been asked curious questions, which made them, feel uncomfortable or where they had asked a question, which they felt asking had made of other people feel uncomfortable. I would then ask them why they felt the curious questions had caused the effect they had had, and whether felt they were helping us move towards and what they thought they should do in the next period.

    I this would encourage them to learn for themselves and identify that asking questions which were too curious or personal may not be helping their group.

    On the other hand, if by curious you mean powerfully revealing questions I would be feeling that things were going well. In a situation like this, at the next intervention I would ask the Group a question, “On a scale of 1 to 10, how do you think you are getting on with asking curious questions which help us get to the root of the problem, where a score of 1 is not very well and 10 is very well?”

    Following on from this, I would then ask them if they could give any examples of where the other group members had asked especially curious questions or where other group members had asked questions, which were helping them, get to the root of the problem.

    This would encourage them to learn for themselves and mutually identify the positive aspects to asking curious questions in their Action Learning session.

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    Megan Bennett

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    While my first inclination is to try to use an “establishing norms” question (something along the lines of “I’ve observed curious questions being asked, did anyone else notice that”, it is possible that my observation could possibly be refuted.

    So instead I may just stick to a learning question. Something like “How is the quality of our questions” or “How are the questions being asked helping to get to the root of the problem?” Of course followed up with “why is that important” and “How will we make it happen?” At the core, it is important to try to encourage conversation around the value of the types of questions being asked to support the overall process.

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    Monica Teófilo

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    Depend, if they are asking just for the people that presented the problem I ask to group about the first rule and why is important ask to everyone at every moment. If they continue to ask curious question I ask to group how they think they are like a group 1 to 10 about exploring the problem. Another possibility is ask about the importance to make questions about the last answer.

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    Trairatt Chaisamran

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    If the Presenter is willing to answer extraordinarily curious questions, that is good for team learning and that may make team members get closer to the real problem. But if Presenter is reluctant, I need to intervene.
    I ask the group if Presenter not comfortable to answer this question, what alternatives do we have. And let the session go on.

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    Pattranee Jullakasewee

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    I would intervene by asking which direction are the team’s questions leading to. I would then ask how these questions help PP and what kinds of questions would be best for helping PP.

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    Andrew Rahaman

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    In answering this question, I will assume that “extraordinarily curious questions” are in-depth, focused questions on the problem that delve beyond the transaction of the problem and also into the assumptions and beliefs. With that in mind, I would wait until an appropriate time for the first intervention. Then, I would ask “how is the quality of the questions?” Followed by “how are the questions helping to understand the problem and possible solutions?”. In doing so, I would be reinforcing the behavior of asking “extraordinarily curious questions”. Finally, I would also ask “who is answering most of these questions?” and what are the benefits of having multiple responses”?

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    Carla Nogueira

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    He would do the intervention based on the session stage of A.L.
    In the exploration step (which often occurs this type of question) I would remember the step that we are and would ask them, on a scale of 1 to 10 how are the questions of the group with regard to understanding the problem?
    Another possible intervention would be to ask the group how the quality of the questions is on a scale of 1 to 10.
    I could ask them how that question would help them in the step we are (and I will mention the step.).

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    ZAMORA DAMIÃO MARIA DE LURDES

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    If the questions are pertinent and do not escape the scope of the problem, that is fine, otherwise, if they do not contemplate the exploration or solution of the problem presented, an intervention will be necessary starting with the question: How do you feel we are acting as a group on a scale of 1 to 10? I would hear each of the participants and then ask: What are we doing well? and What could we improve?

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    Marcelo Conte

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    I as a coach would interfere with the group asking if everyone does not think that the participation of each stakeholder in the questions and answers would not further enrich the subject in both the understanding of the problem and the search for solutions?

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