Scenario: Missed Behavior

As an action learning coach, how would you handle the following situation: At the end of the session, a participant hasn’t practiced their leadership skill.

Tags: Action Leaning, Action Learning Coach, WIAL, WIAL Action Learning, WIAL Talk

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Comments (17)

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    Angela Simone Nicoleti Donadel

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    As an action learning coach I would invite him to thinking what would it have been like if he had practiced this? What kind of new experience could you have lived?

    Also, I will ask the group if them observed during the participant aproach if he applied the leadership skill chosen in practice. Because, some people needs the group support to validated your high self-criticism.

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    Waranunt Chooprasertchok

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    I, as a coach, will ask participant how to understand their leadership skills. Why choose to practice that leadership skill? If participant doesn’t know how to ask question to practice leadership skill. I will ask the team members to ask questions as an example for that participant. And ask participant to consider whether to go into further action learning to choose other leadership skill that are more aptitude or not.

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    June Carter

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    At the conclusion of the session, I follow the standard process of reminding each participant which skill they were working on, then ask them how do they think they did, asking for an example. I would then ask the team when they saw the participant demonstrate the leadership skill. If the individual self-assesses that they did not demonstrate the skill, and the team confirms this through their feedback, I would ask “What was important for you about practicing this leadership skill today?” I might also ask “In reflection, were there opportunities where you might have used the skill yet did not?” “What have you learned from this experience that you can take back to your work or life?” If the individual self-assesses that they did use the skill, and the team does not provide feedback to the contrary, I would ask for specific examples that demonstrated use of the skill, both from the participant and from the team. I would then ask about the impact of demonstrating the skill.

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    Kathryn Jeacock

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    In the debrief at the end of the session I would ask the individual how they think they did working on their leadership skill, I would ask if they think they did Ok or Not Ok? If they felt they did Ok I would ask them to talk me through an example. If they felt they did not do ok i would ask them what they would have liked to have done differently. I would then ask the group how they think the person did and what they observed. I would also hope i had one example of breakthrough questioning or behaviour that helped the group so the person has something positive to take away from the work.

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    Joanna Lee

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    I would also ask the member, if you had the opportunity to replay the session, what would be one question you would have asked that practices your competency? I would also ask the team, if they could help the member with examples of one or two such questions. Through this, I hope the member gets a ‘second chance’. Also, the team gets to contribute to and support that member’s learning, and gain some experience with that specific leadership skill.

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    Ricardo Grzybowski

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    As an Action Learning Coach, I would follow the script by waiting the leadership skills reflection phase. At that moment, if the participant or the team has no observations from what he learned by experimenting to practice the chosen leadership skill, I would ask the question: What could you do better next time? Having it said, I’d let the participant get his take aways, by answering or just doing a silent moment of reflection.

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    Carla Nogueira

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    As a coach he would ask what prevented him from practicing leadership skills. Based on the answer I would explore a bit more about that.
    I would also ask the group if anyone saw him practice the chosen skill. If so, I would ask him again how he realized that.

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    Pei Zheng

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    I will ask the participant what other skills he/she has practiced? Why did him/her not practice this skill, and what did him/her learn from it?
    And in the future, I should remind the team one more time to make sure each person remember to practice their leadership skills.

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    Bettyna Gau Beni

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    I would ask him ou her what would it be if he or she had the chance to practice the leadership skill.

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    Cherry Ge

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    As a action learning coach, I would go through the action learning coach process. I would ask team leadership questions until Reflections on Learning part. How did you demonstrate your leadership competency? Then some members would realize they haven’t applied their leadership competency. Do they have the chance to applied their leadership? How to do better next time.

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    Patrícia Ansarah

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    I would ask the group if there is any feedback of the participant practicing the leadership skills and I would also provide feedback in the case I have noticed. If no one have observed the behavior at all, I would encourage the participant to think about the future in a positive way by asking: How would you practice this behavior in the future? or I you have practiced, what you have done differently?

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    Chaofan (Suprince) MA

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    If this is the answer that the participant responded to my question during the reflection at the end, I’d ask this participant “What makes you think that you didn’t practice the leadership skill you have chosen? Why was that? How do you feel now? What would you do differently next time? ” I would also ask the team “How could the team have supported this member just now? What will the team do to support this member in the future?”

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    Maria Teresa Guanzon

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    I had a member who did not practice their leadership skill in a session. When the members were asked to give feedback there was a long silence, no one seconded the that member’s claim of how the skill was practiced, and a visibly forced positive feedback from one other member. Eventually, I asked the member to share what could be other good practices of that leadership skill. I also asked team members to share their ideas. By doing so, I believe it gave the member pause; realizing her own shortcoming. It also allowed for ideas to be shared without being critical of another. It gave the member and the rest of the team a positive way forward.

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    Alexandra Shevchenko

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    I would ask “looking back at the entire session now, what would you do differently in order to practice the skill? What questions would you ask that would ensure that the skill you selected was displayed? What would you do differently during the next session to practice the skill?” Also, I would ask participants to provide example of questions/statements that could have shown the skill during this session, and would provide my own examples at the end of the discussion.

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    Anna Frummerin

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    This actually happened in my first Action Learning Team coaching session. I asked the following questions: “what made you think that you didn’t practice the leadership skill you have chosen? Why was that? How do you feel now? What would you do differently next time? How can the team support you?”

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    Grace Brelje

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    I would ask, thinking back on this session, where could you have practiced this leadership skill? Followed by, what stopped you from practicing this skill? What could the team have done to support you?

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    Hua(Grace) Pan

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    Practiced or not practiced are all learning opportunities for the participants. In cases where it came from the over-critical judgement of the participant him/herself, I would encourage the peers to provide their observations and then provide my own observation on how well he/she practiced. Very often, my AL participant were encouraged and inspired to think through what this skill really means in terms of behaviors. In some cases where I also echo the participant him/herself and his/her peer’s observation that one skill were not practiced. I would ask ” if you could do it again, what would be one or two opportunities for you to practice your skill? How would you do it?”. Following the participant’s answer, I would say what have you learned from this experience”.

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