Scenario: Too Deep

As an action learning coach, how would you handle the following situation: In exploring deeper roots as to what the real problem is the team gets to the point that the real problem is “world hunger”.

Tags: Action Leaning, Action Learning Coach, WIAL, WIAL Action Learning, WIAL Talk

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Comments (9)

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    Marcelo Conte

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    In this case, since this is a very macro and broad problem, I would try to suggest “peeling” possible solutions actions. If it was still very generic, we could check if there would be a possibility of another session to continue the discussion of the case.

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    Catie Harrison

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    I would intervene with a question like “How are we doing at identifying a problem that is within our control or influence?” The intent is to get the group to lift back up to an aspect of the problem that they have the ability to address.

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    Thadsamon Namsiri

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    As an action learning coach , I would intervene with a question “Is this problem in your authority to control or influence?”
    The intention is to recheck team’s authority in macro and broad problem first, and create team-awareness about team’s authority.

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    Lance Feliciano

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    Though Action Learning is a problem solving process, it doesn’t guarantee success for all problems. Action Learning works within the parameters of the 6 components and 2 ground rules. I will need to remind the Problem Presenter and the members that one of the components, which in this case is the Problem, needs to be feasible to solve and that it is within the authority of the presenter to work on. I would eventually ask the group, “How would you like to proceed?”

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    June Carter

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    I would intervene and ask the group “How are we doing identifying a problem that is within our ability to control, influence or address?” My intention here is for the group to come back to a level where they can have impact with their work.

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    Tharntip Jirakanjana

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    I would make an intervention asking questions around the ownership of the problem:
    1. Who is responsible for the problem?
    2. What has been done to solve this problem?
    3. The involvement of which stakeholders is needed to solve the problem?
    4. Is this problem in your circle of influence?

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    Andrew Rahaman

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    During an intervention, I would ask the group “on a scale of 1-10, ( 1 being low and 10 being high) to what degree are there actions you can take to solve this issue?”
    Then ask “what are the pro’s of having problems and actions we can do with this diverse group?”
    Then ask “how do you want to go forward?”

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    Vera van der Sluijs

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    In this situation I will intervene with the following questions: ‘We have reached a root of the problem, is this something we can change?’, ‘Are we looking at the problem in a macro or micro level?’, ‘How does this effect our problem?’.

    I would like to bring the problem back to a micro level and discover how world hunger effects the team. What issues does the team have that are in a micro level and how does that make them feel?

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    Benjamin Cerny

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    I would first establish if we have consensus on that being the underlying problem that we all agree on. If this is not the case, I would slightly amend the provided followup question to ask “what would help us get to consensus on a problem that we have the ability to take action on?” If there is consensus that the underlying problem is world hunger, that is fine as long as the participants (or at least the problem presenter) feel there are actions they can take to address this problem.

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